Researchers at IIT Madras have developed white light emitters for LED applications

Researchers at the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Madras have developed a white light emitter that can be used in LED applications.

Researchers at the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Madras, have successfully developed a white light emitter that can be used in LED applications. According to the team, since conventional light-emitting diode (LED) materials cannot emit white light, there has been a worldwide search for components that can emit white light directly through these indirect techniques that can reduce efficiency.

Researchers are planning to make LEDs using their distorted “pervaskite” materials. Indigenous-advanced bright white light emitters could potentially replace conventional high-cost materials and significantly save energy costs per lumen. The invention was patented by researchers and recently awarded the “SERB-Technology Translation Award”.

The Science and Engineering Research Board (SERB) provides financial support to researchers, academic institutions, research and development laboratories, industry concerns and other organizations. In addition to the patents, the results of this research work have been published in the prestigious Peer-Review International Journal, part of the Nature Group – Communications Materials.

“Although LEDs are available in almost all colors, white LEDs are a recent development. Conventional LED materials cannot emit white light and special techniques such as coating blue LEDs with yellow phosphor and combining blue, green and red LEDs have been used. To do.

Arvind Kumar Chandiran, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at IIT Madras, said: The team has offered to use a grant of Rs 30 lakh to make LEDs using their distorted Perovskite material.

“Indigenously invented bright white light emitters can replace conventional high-cost materials and significantly save energy costs per lumen. We hope to become a technology leader in light emitters in the near future,” Chandiran added.

In their Communication Materials research paper, the researchers, in addition to detailing specific perovskite elements, also proposed a clear design strategy that scientists could employ to develop white light emitters. “The tactical initiation of distortion at the Halide Perovskite has produced intense light covering the entire visible spectrum. These materials emit at least eight times more intense white light than conventional and well-known Ce: YAG emitters,” says Chandiran.

(PTI)

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